Toolkit2018-08-06T21:09:59+00:00

Civility Center Toolkit

General Civility

  • Manners Made Easy for Teens: 10 Steps to a Life of Confidence, Poise and Respect by June Hines Moore
  • The How Rude! Handbook of School Manners for Teens; Civility in the Hallowed Halls by Alex J. Packer
  • Teen Manners: From Malls to Meals to Messaging and Beyond by Cindy Post Senning
  • Art of Manliness: Classic Skills and Manners for the Modern Man by Brett & Kate McKay
  • The Big Book of Parenting Solutions: 101 Answers to Your Everyday Challenges and Wildest Worries by Michele Borba
  • The No A**hole Rule: Building a Civilized Workplace and Surviving One That Isn’t by Robert I. Sutton
  • The Cost of Bad Behavior: How Incivility Is Damaging Your Business and What To Do About It by Christine M. Pearson & Christine Porath
  • Season of Life: a Football Star, a Boy, a Journey to Manhood by Jeffrey Marx
  • I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou
  • Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
  • The Little Giant of Aberdeen County by Tiffany Baker
  • People of the Book by Geraldine Brooks
  • Little Bee by Chris Cleaver
  • Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress by Sijie Dai
  • Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet by Jamie Ford
  • Still Alice by Lisa Genova
  • Sea of Poppies by Amitav Ghosh
  • Ellen Foster by Kaye Gibbons
  • Three Junes by Julia Glass
  • The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon
  • Just Too Good to be True by E. Lynn Harris
  • The Remains of the Day by Kazuo Ishiguro
  • The Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd
  • Unaccustomed Earth by Jhumpa Lahiri
  • To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • The House on Fortune Street by Margot Livesey
  • The Limpopo Academy of Private Detection by Alexander McCall Smith
  • The Beautiful Things That Heaven Bears by Dinaw Mengestu
  • The Chaperone by Laura Moriarty
  • The Housekeeper and the Professor by Yoko Ogawa
  • When the Emperor Was Divine by Julie Otsuka
  • Handle With Care by Jodi Picoult
  • Home by Marilynne Robinson
  • Sarah’s Key by Tatiana de Rosnay
  • That Old Cape Magic by Richard Russo
  • Shanghai Girls by Lisa See
  • The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows
  • Testimony by Anita Shreve
  • The Help by Kathryn Stockett
  • Olive Kitteridge by Elizabeth Strout
  • Brooklyn by Colm Toibin
  • Rules of Civility by Amor Towles
  • Digging to America by Anne Tyler
  • My Father’s Tears and Other Stories by John Updike
  • Cutting for Stone by Abraham Verghese
  • Beautiful Ruins by Jess Walter
  • The Story of Edgar Sawtelle by David Wroblewski
  • The Case for Civility and Why Our Future Depends On It by Os Guinness
  • Fast Future: How the Millennial Generation Is Shaping Our Worldby David D. Burstein
  • Rude Democracy: Civility and Incivility in American Politics by Susan Herbst
  • Bullying: How to Deal with Taunting, Teasing, and Tormenting by Kathleen Winkler
  • Would It Kill You to Stop Doing That? by Henry Alford
  • Choosing Civility: The Twenty-five Rules of Considerate Conduct by P.M. Forni
  • The Civility Solution: What to Do When People Are Rude by P.M. Forni
  • Why Manners Matter: the Case for Civilized Behavior in a Barbarous World by Lucinda Holdforth
  • What Do You Say When: Talking to People with Confidence on Any Social or Business Occasion by Florence Isaacs
  • Multicultural Manners: Essential Rules of Etiquette for the 21st Century by Norine Dresser
  • Excuse Me, But I Was Next: How to Handle the Top 100 Manners Dilemmas by Peggy Post
  • George Washington’s Rules of Civility and Decent Behavior by George Washington
  • The New Basic Black: Home Training for Modern Times by Karen Grigsby Bates & Karen Elyse Hudson
  • Dude, That’s Rude!: Get Some Manners by Pamela Espeland
  • 50 Things Every Young Gentleman Should Know: What to Do, When to Do It, and Why by John Bridge & Bryan Curtis
  • Emily Post’s The Gift of Good Manners: Parent’s Guide to Raising Respectful, Kind, Considerate Children by Peggy Post & Cindy Post Senning

Character & Values

Civility Around the World

  • Kofi Annan, Chair of the Kofi Annan Foundation, Nobel Peace Prize laureate, 2001, Secretary-General of the United Nations, 1997-2006, Chair of The Elders and of the Africa Progress Panel
  • Her Majesty Queen Noor,Her Majesty Queen Noor of Jordan, Founder & Chair, King Hussein Foundation, Founding Member, Global Zero
  • Linda Allen, Author / Educator / Communication Skills Speaker
  • Michael Barlow, Educator / Middle East & Arab-Israeli Focus Speaker
  • Clydia Forehand. PhD, Educator / Cross-Cultural Trainer & Administrator / Innovator
  • Greg Pringle, Speaker / Consultant / Trainer
  • Gayle Cotton, iNational Emmy Award Winner / Author
  • Harsha Walia, South Asian author / Activist
  • David Chariandy, PhD / Author
  • Helen Haig-Brown (Tsilhoqot’in),Director / Director of Photography / Teacher

Civility at School

  • http://racebridgesforschools.com/wp/?p=2680
    “Yes, we need civility now more than ever. The teaching of civility begins in families, is further nurtured in classrooms and schools, and comes into full bloom as students become young adults, parents, community members, and citizens. And then, hopefully, the cycle begins anew with the next generation.”      -Mary Kimball*
  • http://publiclibrariesonline.org/2013/04/choose-civility-public-libraries-take-center-stage/
    Choose Civility is a community-wide initiative that invites everyone in Howard County to choose respect, empathy, and consideration at every opportunity when interacting with others—at work and in their personal lives.
  • http://www.doorcountycivilityproject.org/index.html
    What are the basic rules of civility? How do we practice civility among friends, in the workplace, and with strangers? How do we make it part of who we are?
  • http://www.studentreach.org/civility
    Many schools are looking for school assemblies that address the critical issue of bullying. They sometimes back those anti-bullying school assemblies up with increased discipline. But the research shows that this well-intentioned approach has not shown the desired results:
  • http://www.students.education.jhu.edu/studentaffairs/civility/
    “Civility is behavior that demonstrates consistent respect for others, including an effort to understand differences. Civility helps to create an environment within the School of Education where all are valued and can be productive.”
  • http://www.stageoflife.com/StageHighSchool/TeensandCivility.aspx
    “Civility” is defined as the practice of good manners in both speech and behavior.  We wanted to know if teens thought that the practice of good manners and using proper etiquette are remnants of past generations…or do we still have what it takes to be civil to each other and show each other respect?
  • http://projectcivility.rutgers.edu/about-project-civility
    In 2009, Dr. Kathleen Hull, the Director for the Byrne Family First Year Seminars and Dean Mark Schuster, Senior Dean of Students, had a conversation that would create the foundation for what became to be known as Project Civility at Rutgers.
  • http://civilityconsulting.com/
    We work with corporations and small businesses that want to communicate a consistent and memorable brand to the marketplace, build an inviting and collaborative company culture, and create an extraordinary customer experience on a daily basis.
  • http://www.tammythomashopson.com/page/481683674
    Commit to raising awareness of kind, respectful behavior and encourage others to do the same by discarding un-civil practices like the ones listed below (just to name a few): Giving your cell phone attention over people currently in your presence, Displaying aggressive behaviors while driving, including negative words and actions to other aggressive drivers, Inconsideration through excessive tardiness, ALL kinds of bullying behaviors
  • http://www.monocoe.org/
    Mono County Office of Education is committed to serving students, schools and communities by providing and supporting exemplary educational programs in a professional and fiscally-sound manner in order to foster healthy and productive individuals.
  • Achieving civility at school:
    A case study (An ICLE best practices book) Paperback – 2000
    Willard R Daggett (Author)
    Achieving civility at school is a case study done by Willard Daggett and his associates Benedict Kruse and Gary Fields. A detailed post-Columbine analysis of school civility and violence prevention, the study concluded: “Peace happens as a way of life; enforcement is not real peace.” This book will help make your school a safe, respectful, and engaging place for all students.
  • The How Rude! Handbook of School Manners for Teens: Civility in the Hallowed Halls (How Rude Handbooks for Teens…
    by Alex J. Packer
    What counts as rude behavior in school? What can you do when a teacher is rude? What’s the best way to handle bullies and bigots?
    Here’s sound advice (touched with humor) for teens who want to make school more bearable.
  • Restoring School Civility: Essential for the Success of No Child Left Behind
    Dr. Philip Fitch Vincent (Author)
    The most prolific trainer of character and civility in schools now shares the heart and spirit of his quintessential plan for success! This comprehensive and long-awaited primer defines the need for civility in our schools, and outlines the steps by which any school can achieve a productive, civil and caring climate. Dr. Vincent’s clearly-defined approaches are supported by case studies and action plans that include: Providing consistency for young children Using consistent practices and procedures How good habits build civility Promoting civility through literature and narratives Developing a mission statement on civility Promoting civility through service
  • The Respectful School: How Educators and Students Can Conquer Hate and Harassment
    Stephen Wessler (Author), William Preble (Author)
    Not a school day goes by without some student facing teasing or slurs in the hallways, classrooms, or playgrounds. Left unchecked, such harassment can escalate and create an oppressive school climate where stress and fear overpower learning. In The Respectful School, Stephen L. Wessler and contributing author William Preble vividly describe how words can hurt–both emotionally and physically–and how words can heal. Drawing on his experience as a former state prosecutor overseeing hate crime enforcement and as current director of the Center for the Prevention of Hate Violence, Wessler discusses what educators can do to create a truly respectful environment that promotes positive interactions among staff and students.
  • Civility, Compassion, and Courage in Schools Today: Strategies for Implementing in K-12 Classrooms
    Patricia Kohler-Evans (Author), Candice Dowd Barnes (Author)
    Over the past two decades, and perhaps even before the “No Child Left Behind Act,” policy makers and others have managed to drain civility, compassion, and courage from everyday classroom instruction. We have grown to become an educational system that is almost solely focused on academics at the expense of teaching to the whole child. Civility, Compassion, and Courage in Schools Today argues that civility, compassion and courage are absolutely essential to foster good citizenship—to encourage and motivate students to action—to take on the perspectives of others, and to see how they can become productive members in an ever changing global community. Using the authors’ “Model of Influence,” a four level hierarchy, they suggest that students can be taught to be more civil, compassionate, and courageous, even when facing adversity, and can move from developing a consciousness about these attributes into embracing influence and taking bold action.
  • In Search of Civility: Confronting Incivility on the College Campus
    Kent M. Weeks
    “In Search of Civility” provides relevant context for the complex civility challenges facing students, faculty, and administrators. Colleges can play an important role in instilling civility among their students in their academic and social lives. Civil conduct requires treating others the way one wishes to be treated as well as a sense of duty and responsibility to the community.
    By raising questions, “In Search of Civility” challenges students to make the connection between the morals and values they claim to hold and the practical implications of those values expressed through acts of civility in every part of their lives.
    Weeks draws on a wide range of experiences–as teacher of undergraduate and graduate students at George Peabody College, Vanderbilt University, and as legal advisor to colleges throughout the US.
  • Getting Classroom Management RIGHT: Guided Discipline and Personalized Support in Secondary Schools (In the Partners in Learning Series)
    Carol Miller Lieber
    Getting Classroom Management RIGHT provides resources specifically designed for teachers who work with adolescents and want to create learning environments that foster fairness, mutual respect, student accountability, and self-discipline. It offers research-based tools, skills, and guiding principles that enable secondary teachers to organize and manage their classrooms for optimal learning; prevent most disruptive behaviors; diagnose and respond to problematic behaviors efficiently; and provide the right kinds of accountable consequences and supportive interventions that will help reluctant and resistant students to turn around their behavior.
  • The Hope for Audacity: Recapturing Optimism and Civility in Education (Critical Education and Ethics)
    Terri Jo Swim (Editor), Keith Howard (Editor), Il-Hee Kim (Editor
    For far too long, public education had been under the shadow of terms such as failing schools, achievement gaps, and poor classroom management. While many publications have outlined these issues, the goal of this book is not to resonate despair but to illuminate our hopes and dreams for public education. For the authors of this book, having the audacity to hope for better public education means trusting teachers and children to engage in intellectual endeavors that advocate for the development of the whole person and active participation in a democratic community. This book will be a great resource for pre-service and in-service teachers, professors, administrators, and policy-makers in exploring a new pathway for educational reform.
  • Doing Civility: Breaking the Cycle of Incivility on the Campus
    by Kent M. Weeks
    Doing Civility: Breaking the Cycle of Incivility on the Campus, explores ways in which members of the college community can take proactive steps to break the cycle of incivility. Civility requires extending mutual respect to others, especially people with different values, beliefs, and ideas. It also involves a civic responsibility to strengthen the community.
    Doing Civility dives into how civility can be applied in practical ways using real-life student stories.
    Doing Civility is a companion book to In Search of Civility. Together, the two books provide sharp analysis for understanding civility on campus and in the workplace. Doing Civility incorporates interactive tools and exercises at the end of each chapter designed to help readers apply the concepts covered in the chapter. The tools and exercises are perfect for self-reflection or small group discussions.
    Americans are trouble by the growing incivility they see in public life and in their interpersonal relationships. The modern college and university may offer the best and most effective forum for providing an education in civility for our future leaders. It’s time to do civility.
  • Civility in Politics and Education (Routledge Studies in Contemporary Philosophy)
    Deborah Mower (Editor), Wade L. Robison (Editor)
    This book examines the concept of civility and the conditions of civil disagreement in politics and education. Although many assume that civility is merely polite behavior, it functions to aid rational discourse. Building on this basic assumption, the book offers multiple accounts of civility and its contribution to citizenship, deliberative democracy, and education from Eastern and Western as well as classic and modern perspectives. Given that civility is essential to all aspects of public life, it is important to address how civility may be taught. While much of the book is theoretical, contributors also apply theory to practice, offering concrete methods for teaching civility at the high school and collegiate levels.

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  • http://respectinschool.com/
    Respect in School is Canada’s only on-line bullying, abuse, harassment and neglect prevention program for all school-based leaders. This program is ideal for any adult or student leader in a position of power and trust over other students and has been crafted to be completed by all school personnel including;
    • Teachers
    • Administrators
    • Counselors
    • Custodians
    • School Bus Drivers
    • Parent Volunteers
    • Any school leader who may interact with students
  • http://www.goodcharacter.com/ISOC/Respect.html
    Character Building and Training exercises, teaching plans for grade 7
  • http://www.trainingabc.com/respect/
    “When managing a diverse workforce, respect is essential in maintaining employee morale, productivity, and a creative, vibrant company atmosphere. Any given company employs a multitude of generations, as well as employees of different ethnicities, religions, personal beliefs, values, experiences, and work styles. To build a successful team, it’s important that each individual employee is aware of… read more the overwhelming impact that showing respect to coworkers, managers, and subordinates has on the overall company, and our respect in the workplace videos provide essential training on just this.”
  • http://respectgroupinc.com/
    “Respect Group was incorporated on April 5th, 2004 by co-founders, Sheldon Kennedy and Wayne McNeil, to pursue their common passion: the prevention of abuse, bullying and harassment. Respect Group has enlisted internationally acclaimed curriculum partner, the Canadian Red Cross and created a best-in-class e-learning platform. Expert content and a professional online certification model round out Respect Group’s fully outsourced risk management behavior-change solutions for sport, schools and the workplace.”
  • http://www.redcross.ca/what-we-do/violence–bullying-and-abuse-prevention
    “Find out what our professional online Violence, Bullying and Abuse Prevention learning centre has to offer! Each course will have information on how you can register.”
  • http://www.expectrespectaustin.org/
    Expect Respect® engages youth, parents, schools and community organizations in promoting healthy teen relationships and preventing dating abuse.
  • http://www.a-to-z-of-manners-and-etiquette.com/school-etiquette.html
    Good discipline is a prerequisite of kids to enable school teachers to be able to teach a group of children the skills they will rely on for the rest of their lives. If School Etiquette in its many aspects is not spelt out for them, how are they to know what the boundaries are?
  • http://www.parents.com/toddlers-preschoolers/development/manners/
    “Teaching kids about good manners starts by reminding your child to say please and thank you. Here you’ll learn how to encourage good manners and proper etiquette including, how to behave at the table, on play dates, at restaurants, and more.”
  • http://www.emilypost.com/in-school
    Created for presentation in schools and libraries these workshops are approximately 1 hour in length, but can be tailored to fit a school’s individual timetable. The workshops are suitable for children ages 8-13, with an audience size of 50-75.
  • http://www.etiquetteoutreach.com/etiquette-courses-description-schools/
  • http://youtu.be/tuqU_c4bDXA
    Students experience an instructional model that is consistent with the school day.
    Modeling (visual, auditory, and kinesthetic)
    Group or shared practice
    Independent practice
    Assessment
    Coupled with an immediate, hands-on application of what they’ve just learned, students experience greater understanding and success in applying their new skills. Instruction ends with a group discussion, or a quiz on an etiquette-related subject.
  • Mary Bixby
    Learning Resource Specialist, The Learning Center
    PHONE: 573-881-5858 (cell / local)
    E-MAIL: BixbyM@missouri.edu
    Topics:
    Partner benefits, diversity in the classroom, and LGBT issues
  • Lea Cheyney Brandt
    Clinical Assistant Professor and Associate Director,
    MU Center for Health Ethics
    PHONE: 573-884-5576
    E-MAIL: BrandtLC@health.missouri.edu
    Topics: Ethics and professionalism
  • Karen Harris
    Director, Patient and Family-Centered Care, MU Health Care
    PHONE: 573-882-2235 or 573-808-0036
    E-MAIL: HarrisKD@health.missouri.edu
    Topics:
    In my role at MUHC, I am responsible for developing and implementing strategies across the organization to promote a patient-centered environment. This involves working closely with faculty and staff to teach communication skills and relationship-based care and the impact this has on not only the patient and family but faculty and staff. I currently teach patient and family-centered care(PFCC) at new staff orientation for both employees and faculty (attending, fellows and residents) I provide presentations to outside organizations such as Missouri League of Nursing and Human Resources Association providing topics related to conflict resolution, customer service, communication and service recovery.
  • James Hunter
    Director, Employee Assistance Program
    PHONE: 573-882-6701
    E-MAIL: HunterJD@missouri.edu
    Topics:
    Civility and incivility in the workplace
  • Frankie Minor
    Director, Residential Life
    PHONE: 573-882-7275
    E-MAIL: Frankie@missouri.edu
    Topics:
    Experience in helping promote civility/community responsibility in residential settings; initially pitched, promoted and involved in the creation of the institutional values, including Respect and Responsibility.
  • Lisa Zanetti
    Associate Professor, Truman School of Public Affairs
    PHONE: 573-424-1857 (cell)
    E-MAIL: ZanettiL@missouri.edu
    Topics:
    Empathy as a public and private value. Mental health and invisible disabilities. I have bipolar disorder, fibromyalgia and chronic migraines. I am quite public about these and in fact sit on the City of Columbia’s Disabilities Commission to represent invisible disabilities.
  • Lee Wilkins
    Curator’s Teaching Professor, Missouri School of Journalism
    E-MAIL: WilkinsL@missouri.edu
    Topics:
    Media ethics
  • Jim Leach
    Jim Leach, chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities, gives a Clinton School lecture titled, “Civility in a Fractured Society,” about the danger that stridency poses to open debate and compromise in America’s democracy. Leach is the ninth chairman of the NEH, which is an independent grant-making agency of the U.S. government dedicated to supporting research, education, preservation and public programs in the humanities.
  • Dr. Cornell W. Clayton
    Director, Thomas S. Foley Institute for Public Policy and Public Service, Washington State University
    Cornell Clayton is Director of the Thomas S. Foley Institute of Public Policy and Public Service, and C.O. Johnson Distinguished Professor of Political Science, at Washington State University.  Dr. Clayton received his B.A. in political science from the University of Utah, and his Master’s and Doctoral degrees inpolitics from Oxford University.  The author or editor of seven books and numerous journal articles and book chapters, Professor Clayton currently serves as Editor of Political Research Quarterly, the journal of the Western Political Science Association.  His recent book, Civility and American Democracy (co-edited with Richard Elgar), was published last year and is the product of a major scholarly conference examining the relationship between civil behavior and democratic governance  organized by the Foley Institute and funded through a quarter-million dollar grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.   Among Professor Clayton many distinctions, he has twice been a Fulbright Scholar, and held fellowships at the European Union Institute in Florence, the Salzburg Institute in Austria, the Miller Center for Politics at the University of Virginia, and this coming year will hold the Wayne N. Aspinall Distinguished Visiting Chair at Colorado Mesa University.
  • Dr. Bertie Simmons
    Principal, Furr High School, Houston, Texas
    Dr. Bertie Simmons has been an educator for 48 years, holding numerous positions within the Houston Independent School District.  Since 2000, she has been the principal at Furr High School, and in that role has turned the school and its student body around from one of hopelessness, violence, and fear to one of creativity, determination and achievement.  Dr. Simmons was recently recognized for her work when she received the Texas State HEB Secondary Principal of the Year Award in 2009, the most recent in a long line of recognitions.
  • Patty Kohler, Ed. D
    An associate professor at the University of Central Arkansas in the Department of Elementary, Literacy, and Special Education. As a former teacher, she has worked with students with disabilities for over thirty years. She has nineteen years of experience as a special education administrator in the largest district in Arkansas, serving urban students with numerous needs stemming from poverty, disability, and race. While there, she focused on inclusive education and making sure that the needs of all students were met. During her tenure in Little Rock, the district co-hosted the state’s first conference on inclusive education.
  • Candice Dowd Barnes, Ed.D.
    Assistant professor at the University of Central Arkansas in the department of Elementary, Literacy and Special Education. She is also the Chief Operations Officer for Parker Education & Development, LLC. Parker Education & Development, LLC offers professional development and educational coaching using unique Edutainment activities to promote effective relationships and interactions with students, parents, co-workers and colleagues. She strongly believes in the power of authentic learning experiences to teach beyond the walls of the classroom into all aspects of life.

Civility for Home & Family

  • Manners Made Easy for the Family: 365 Timeless Etiquette Tips for Every Occasion [Kindle Edition] June Hines Moore (Author)
  • Character Building for Kids: Cartoon Guide to Good Manners with Family Discussions [Kindle Edition] Jean Tracy (Author)
  • TEACHING YOUR CHILDREN GOOD MANNERS: Discover How To Easily Teach Your Children The Essential 7 Good Manners Rules That Assure Success And Good Relationships … Future (The Easy Parenting Series Book 5) [Kindle Edition] Cynthia Tyler (Author)
  • Raising Kids with Good Manners [Kindle Edition] Donna Jones (Author)
  • 365 Manners Kids Should Know: Games, Activities, and Other Fun Ways to Help Children and Teens Learn Etiquette [Kindle Edition] Sheryl Eberly (Author)
  • Good Manners with Family [Kindle Edition] Ann Ingalls (Author), Ronnie Rooney (Illustrator)
  • Grow in a Worthy Manner: Family [Kindle Edition] Marco de Mello (Author)
  • The Book of New Family Traditions (Revised and Updated): How to Create Great Rituals for Holidays and Every Day [Kindle Edition] Meg Cox (Author)

Civility at Work

  • Michelle Ray
    Can your organization afford the high cost of low morale? Inform, educate and motivate your leaders and teams to take initiative, transform attitudes and inspire action for long-term success.
  • Gloria Petersen
    Author, SME trainer, and seminar leader specializing in improving relationships with polished image and dynamic business social skills
  • Barbara Bartlein
    Workplace culture expert and published authority on bullying, teamwork and productivity. Pianist and singer, she brings music and motivation to all her programs.
  • Lauren Schieffer
    Champion of Personal Influence through High Road Communication
  • Tracy Stuckrath
    Award-winning event professional and dynamic speaker teaching hospitality professionals how to make events healthier, safer and delicious.
  • Eileen Kugler
    Inspirational thought-leader sharing proven strategies to create inclusive, high-achieving diverse schools and worksites
  • Dr. Stephanie Weiland Knarr
    National Expert on Workplace Communication and Conflict Resolution, EAP Workplace Consultant for MedStar Health, Marriage and Family Therapist
  • Paul Akers
    Entrepreneur, Thought Leader, Author, Speaker, & Lean Maniac
  • Audrey Nelson PhD
    A communication expert with 30 years training and consulting experience and 3 degrees in Communication, including a PhD.
  • Elayne Savage
    Rejection hurts. A look, a tone of voice, or certain words can ruin your whole day. And when this affects productivity, emotional costs translate into dollars lost.
  • Sources:
    http://www.espeakers.com/marketplace/topics/topic/287/Workplace-Respect

Civility in Politics

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Civility in the Community

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Leadership Skills

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Social & Confidence Etiquette

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Communicate Civility

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Our Favorite Tools

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